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Vieraskieliset / In-english

Gree­tings from the child­ren in Ke­nya!

Vieraskieliset / In-english
5.12.2019 15.17

The last few ki­lo­me­ters of the ride to the lo­ca­ti­on of the ser­vi­ces are bum­py. The child­ren in the yard no­ti­ce us and run to greet us. The ol­der child­ren can speak Eng­lish well. An in­terp­re­ter helps us vi­sit with the rest – eve­ry­o­ne is ab­le to greet and say their name wit­hout an in­terp­re­ter.

We are on a mis­si­on trip in Ke­nya, Af­ri­ca. We hold the first ser­vi­ces in the Sid­wa­ka home in Bu­ma­la.

Em­ma­nu­el Amet­si­fe keeps the first ser­mon. He came on this mis­si­on trip from anot­her Af­ri­can count­ry, Togo. At the ser­vi­ces the child­ren sit on bam­boo mats on the floor. Alt­hough the cir­cums­tan­ces are dif­fe­rent, God’s word and the gos­pel are exact­ly the same as in Fin­land and eve­ryw­he­re el­se in the world.

Af­ter the ser­vi­ces Mii­ka Kop­pe­roi­nen re­la­tes gree­tings from Fin­land. The child­ren are ama­zed at the pho­tos of win­ter snow and free­zing we­at­her. The dif­fe­ren­ce in tem­pe­ra­tu­re bet­ween Fin­land and Ke­nya is ne­ar­ly 50 deg­rees.

In the yard af­ter the ser­vi­ces we try pla­ying the Fin­nish na­ti­o­nal sport cal­led pe­sä­pal­lo. Du­ring the game the ball made from a bag of le­a­ves gets stuck in a tree. Luc­ki­ly we are ab­le to get it down be­fo­re we le­a­ve.

At the end of the mis­si­on trip we hold ser­vi­ces in Nai­ro­bi. We hold a Sun­day school les­son du­ring the first ser­mon—the to­pic is Da­niel in a den of li­ons.

School in Ke­nya:

In Ke­nya child­ren go to presc­hool

al­re­a­dy at 3–4 ye­ars of age. They start ele­men­ta­ry school at the age of 6.

The child­ren are taught in Eng­lish and Swa­hi­li.

The school ye­ar has three se­mes­ters.

The child­ren wear school uni­forms. There is no free lunch.

The child­ren in­de­pen­dent­ly read the ope­ning and clo­sing pra­yers and ac­ti­ve­ly ans­wer the qu­es­ti­ons. They rai­se their hand to get a turn to speak and stand up while they are spe­a­king—just like Fin­nish child­ren used to do in school.

As we le­a­ve to re­turn home we pro­mi­se to con­vey the Ke­ny­an child­ren’s gree­tings to Sun­day school child­ren and all child­ren of their age in Fin­land.

Rael ran to the ser­vi­ces

Rael Atie­no Owi­no is an 8-ye­ar-old girl. She li­ves on the shore of Lake Ka­ny­a­bo­li in Ke­nya, Af­ri­ca. She at­tends ser­vi­ces and Sun­day school. She thinks Bib­le sto­ries and Sun­day school pic­tu­res are the best part of Sun­day school.

Rael has come home from school for lunch. The school is 3–4 ki­lo­me­ters away. When we won­de­red how she was ab­le to come home for lunch and then re­turn to school du­ring the lunchb­re­ak, Rael and her sib­lings sho­wed us how fast they run home from school. ❏

Text: Jou­ni Hin­tik­ka

Pub­lis­hed in the Las­ten Pol­ku pa­per 4/2019.

Trans­la­ti­on: K.K.